April 27th, 2016

Sanders offers Clinton a bouquet

After weeks of brickbats, Sanders softens combative tone

By RON KAMPEAS

WASHINGTON (JTA) — ‪The combative tone in Bernie Sanders’ campaign statements faded on Tuesday evening to a softer pitch of suasion.

“I congratulate Secretary Clinton on her victories tonight, and I look forward to issue-oriented campaigns in the 14 contests to come,” Sanders’ statement began after his rival for the Democratic presidential nod, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, rolled to victories in four of the five states in play that day.

Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders greet each other at the CNN Presidential Debate in Brooklyn, N.Y., April 14, 2016. (Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders greet each other at the CNN Presidential Debate in Brooklyn, N.Y., April 14. (Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

Prior to the statement, Clinton had “applauded” Sanders and his causes, signifying a party ready to rally toward the general election and a likely contest between Clinton and Donald Trump, the Republican front-runner who swept the five primaries on Tuesday.

Aides to Sanders, the Independent senator from Vermont, in recent days had presaged a “reassessment” of the campaign should Clinton perform well in the Tuesday contests. Sanders’ statement encapsulated what “reassessment” looks like going forward, in effect acknowledging that Clinton is the likely candidate while remaining in the race to influence the shape of the Democratic Party in years to come.

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April 27th, 2016

Yom HaShoah on May 4 at Beth Jacob

The 2014 Twin Cities Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) Commemoration took place Sunday night at Temple of Aaron Synagogue in St. Paul. At the conclusion of the program, survivors assembled on the bima, holding yahrzeit candles, and sang "Hatikvah" and "America the Beautiful." The event is sponsored by the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas (JCRC), Children of Holocaust Survivors Association in Minnesota (CHAIM), Temple of Aaron Synagogue, Jewish Federation of Greater St. Paul and Minneapolis Jewish Federation.

The 2014 Twin Cities Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) Commemoration took place at Temple of Aaron Synagogue in St. Paul. At the conclusion of the program, survivors assembled on the bima, holding yahrzeit candles, and sang “Hatikvah” and “America the Beautiful.”

This year’s commemoration will feature speaker discussing Nazi-looted artworks

The 2016 Twin Cities Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) Commemoration will be held 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 4, at Beth Jacob Congregation, 1179 Victoria Curve, St. Paul.

Donald S. Burris, a leading expert in the pursuit of art stolen by the Nazis before and during World War II, and co-counsel on the Nazi looted-art case that inspired the recent film, Woman in Gold, will speak at the commemoration.

For more information visit www.minndakjcrc.org.

April 27th, 2016

Building a Brighter Future

A symposium on the benefits of pre-school education will be held from 1 to 3 p.m., Sunday, May 1 at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs, 301 – 19th Ave. S., Minneapolis, on the U of M West Bank campus.

Speaking at the symposium, presented by the Twin Cities Maimonides Society of the Jewish Federation of Greater St. Paul and Minneapolis Jewish Federation, will be Dr. Jeff Schiff, Medical Director of the Minnesota Department of Human Services; Dr. Megan Gunnar, Director of the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Child Development and Dr. Art Rolnick, Senior Fellow at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

The conference is free and open to the public. Reservations are encouraged. Contact Dan Lepow, of the Jewish Federation of Greater St. Paul, at 651-695-3185 or dlepow@stpaulfed.org.

April 27th, 2016

B’nai Abraham presents free concert

The Mesabi Chamber Ensemble will present a free concert at the B’nai Abraham Museum and Cultural Center in Virginia, Minn., 7 p.m., Friday, May 6.

The 13-piece mostly string group, directed by Sheila Wilcox, is an offshoot of the Mesabi Symphony Orchestra. The ensemble will perform works composed by Telemann, Bach, Respighi, Vaughan Williams, Albeniz and Leroy Anderson.

The museum is located at 328 5th St. S., Virginia. For more information, visit www.ironrangejewishheritage.org.

April 21st, 2016

Scrap stories

Jews dominated the junk and scrap industry in Minnesota, which was the precursor to what is now the Green Revolution

By ERIN ELLIOTT BRYAN / Community News Editor

“The Jew who visits the farmer and tries to buy the old rubber… must persuade the farmer that it is better to sell old rubber, even at a few cents, than to burn it.”
— Ninth Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor of the State of Minnesota, 1903-1904

This year, Passover begins on Friday, April 22 — the same date on which Earth Day has fallen each year since it was first commemorated in 1970. And this year there is more significant overlap between the two with a new exhibit that is on display at the Sabes JCC in St. Louis Park, Peddlers to Processors: Scrap Stories from the Upper Midwest.

The comprehensive exhibit celebrates the state’s Jewish peddlers and “junk men,” who organizers say were the “original recyclers.”

“They were recycling everything because everything had a value to someone,” said Jamie Heilicher, president of the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest (JHSUM), which produced the exhibit.

The century-old cart used by Hyman Kaplan when he started his scrap business in Northfield, Minn., is the centerpiece of Peddlers to Processors: Scrap Stories from the Upper Midwest, which is on display through May 26 at the Sabes JCC. (Photos: Erin Elliott Bryan)

The century-old cart used by Hyman Kaplan when he started his scrap business in Northfield, Minn., is the centerpiece of Peddlers to Processors: Scrap Stories from the Upper Midwest, which is on display through May 26 at the Sabes JCC. (Photos: Erin Elliott Bryan)

Peddlers to Processors begins in the hallway outside of the Tychman Shapiro Gallery, where a timeline of immigration is presented. According to Myrna Orensten, a JHSUM board member and curator of the exhibit, some two and a half million Jews immigrated to the United States from the harsh circumstances of Eastern Europe’s Pale of Settlement between 1880 and 1924.

These new immigrants had little to no education and were pushed westward, with many settling in the Upper Midwest — the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota — where they created this industry out of necessity. Some of the earliest settlers began trading furs with the Indians, and later immigrants became peddlers of rags, paper, oil and grease, pots and pans, bottles and scrap metal.

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April 21st, 2016

Palestine’s master builders

Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architects of a New City, by Adina Hoffman, Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 352 pages, $28

Reviewed by NEAL GENDLER

Don’t let a tepid title and seemingly tame topic deter you from this surprisingly entertaining explanation of development in British Mandate Jerusalem.

Till We Have Built Jerusalem is Adina Hoffman’s deeply researched and brightly written story of visions for a 20th-century holy city and three architects of some of its most characteristic buildings.

Erich Mendelsohn, Austen St. Barbe Harrison and Spyro Houris, very different, now are “barely remembered, and the city or cities they had in mind are vanishing as well,” Hoffman says.

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Mendelsohn, “among Weimar Germany’s most-acclaimed architects,” designed Hadassah’s Mount Scopus hospital and medical school, Anglo-Palestine Bank, parts of Hebrew University and Weizmann Institute, Weizmann’s home in Rehovot, and Haifa’s Rambam hospital. Harrison, a Mandate official, designed Rockefeller Museum, Government House and the post office. And Houris — possibly Khoury in a Greek spelling — created a distinctive row of buildings on Jaffa Road near Zion Square, and elegant houses with exteriors displaying colorful Armenian tiles.

Most developed, documented and interesting is Mendelsohn, “the squat man with the soaring ideas.” Designer of Einstein Tower in Potsdam and a world-class figure, he arrived with his wife in 1934, setting up shop and home in a bladeless Rehavia windmill.

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January 13th, 2016

Seeking an Administrative Assistant

The American Jewish World has an immediate opening for a person to work part-time (15-20 hours per week), M-Th, as an Administrative Assistant. The ideal candidate will be proficient with Sage (Peachtree) bookkeeping and MS Access database software. Other attributes include a pleasant phone and personal presence, a great attention to detail, and, of course, a sense of humor. The job duties are varied, and the office setting is hardworking but casual.

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We seek someone who is attuned to what’s happening in the world, and would like to be part of a beloved community newspaper that has been publishing for more than 100 years.

Please send a cover letter and resume to: editor [at] ajwnews [dot] com. No phone calls please. Thanks.